Tag: summer reading

REVIEW: Tokyo Ghoul

REVIEW: Tokyo Ghoul

What happens when college student Kaneki finally goes on a date with his crush Rize? Well, she turns out to be a ghoul and tries to eat him. When the smoke clears on this situation, Kaneki is part-human, part-ghoul, and has to figure out how to navigate as different person–holding to his “human values” (not eating people, etc.) while fighting his nature (only human flesh can satisfy his hunger).

It’s a philosophical sort of manga, with references to Kafka’s Metamorphosis and Herman Hesse (“Who would be born must first destroy the world”). Volume 1 was super-interesting, and if the following mangas are as engaging, I’m going to be reading this one for a while.

REVIEW: The Coldest City

REVIEW: The Coldest City

The Coldest City is a sparse, slow-burning, noir graphic novel set in Berlin near the end of the Cold War. A missing list containing the identities of all secret agents operating in Berlin (on both sides) is the linchpin around which this story moves.

As a spy thriller, the graphic novel is well set up, but knowing that it was a spy novel, I found some of the plot revelations predictable. Unfortunately, with spy novels, that’s half the fun–getting my mind blown by plot twists. That said, the graphic novel has an interesting set of characters and enough layers that, even with a somewhat obvious conclusion, it’s still worth the price of admission.

Also, The Coldest City is apparently the inspiration for an upcoming film? I did not know.

 

My Summer Reading

My Summer Reading

I’ve been reading an assortment of books this summer; my goal was to read more, and lately I’ve been finding more time to read (since exiting college and beginning work).

  1. Born Again, Chuck Colson
  2. Scary Close, Donald Miller – excellent book on relationships and the author’s journey from “public isolation” to a life of intimacy
  3. The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon, Stephen King – this was a fun, shorter novel
  4. A Symphony of Sol, B. L. White
  5. The Coldest War, Sam Hart